Grief Recovery Support Group: The Action Program for  Moving Beyond Death, Divorce and Other Losses
 People may say you have to let go and move on in your life,
but they don’t tell you what you need to do to accomplish that.
The Mental Health Association in New Jersey will be offering a new series entitled, The Grief Recovery Method®, which can make coping with grief possible as and provide partnerships and guidance to help ensure that it happens.
Whether your loss is due to:
The death of a loved one
Divorce or end of a relationship
Career changes
Lack of trust
Questioning faith
Safety concerns
Health issues
 Your feelings are normal and natural.
The problem is that we have been socialized to believe that these
feelings are abnormal and inappropriate.
Myths about grief:
Time heals all wounds
Replace the loss
Grieve alone
Be strong for others
Bury your feelings
The Grief Recovery Method® Outreach Program group will be scheduled periodically throughout the year.
Cost for this session only $50 for the eight weeks.
(Regular price is $250 for eight weeks.)
To register or if you have any questions please contact Laverne Williams, Certified Grief Recovery Specialists® at 973-571-4100, ext. 130, or lwilliams@mhanj.org.
MHANJ’s MHFA4NJ Project Receives National Excellence Award

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey is honored to receive the Excellence in Mental Health First Aid Community Impact Award from the National Council for Behavioral Health. This award is for achievement in serving as a leader in coordinating Mental Health First Aid Training across New Jersey through our Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey (MHFA4NJ) Project, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Our shared recognition is extended to our core stakeholders who collaborate with us in providing training and shaping the project.

The Healing Power of Nature

Healthcare practitioners employ an array of modalities in the treatment of physical and mental health disorders. Medication management, therapy, exercise and other lifestyle changes are regularly recommended.  Often overlooked is an inexpensive option for the maintenance of good physical and mental health: nature. There is now a significant body of evidence supporting the mental health benefits of outdoor immersion.

“Green therapy” known as ecotherapy, has been shown to alleviate symptoms of depression.  In the early 1980’s, the forest agency of Japan encouraged people to walk in the woods for better health. Known as “forest bathing” or shinrin-yoku, the practice was believed to lower stress.  Yoshifumi Miyazaki, researcher at Chiba University in Japan, found significantly lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol in people who spent 40 minutes daily walking in the woods compared to those spending 40 minutes walking in a lab.

Similarly, in a 2010 multi-study analysis, conducted by researchers from the University of Essex in the United Kingdom revealed a 71% reduction in depressive symptoms for those who simply took a walk outside compared to a control group who took a walk at a shopping center. Of the shopping center walkers, only 45% reported reduced depression while 22% felt more depressed. Nature exposure produced both short-term and long-term positive health outcomes in self-esteem and mood. The greatest improvements in self-esteem were found in people with mental health disorders.

In 2015, Stanford researchers compared psychological effects of two groups of participants; one which walked for 90 minutes in a high traffic urban setting while the second walked in a grassland setting with trees and shrubs. Although little difference was found in physiological conditions, interestingly, decreased neural activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex was found in those walking in urban areas. This brain region is involved in rumination during which individuals may focus on negative emotions and is implicated in the development of depressive symptoms. (http://www.pnsa.org/content/early/2015/06/23/1510459112)

In an increasingly urbanized world, these findings suggest access to a natural environment and the preservation of parks, trees and open spaces may be vital to mental health. Currently more than half of the world’s population resides in an urban area. Notably, city dwellers experience a 40% higher risk of mood disorders compared to rural dwellers. They also experience a 20% higher risk of anxiety disorders and twice the rates of schizophrenia. (https://depts.washington-edu/hhwb/Thm_Mental.html)

At the forefront of studying the connection between people and environment is The Natural Capital Project (http://www.naturalcapitalproject.org/) a joint partnership between Stanford University, The University of Minnesota, the Nature Conservancy and the World Wildlife Fund. Using an interdisciplinary team, the project develops quantifiable methods to understand the nexus between environment and health. Using science-informed decisions, targeted capital investments are then made to maintain the wellbeing of both.

Exactly how nature works to improve a sense of wellbeing is unclear, however the foregoing studies and projects strongly suggest at the very least, time spent in a natural environment improves people’s moods.  Danielle Shanahan Phd, researcher at the University of Queensland, reports simply putting a plant in your window elicits a range of benefits. While some may be able to take a daily walk in a natural setting, we can also strive to make our schools, offices, and living spaces healthier by the addition of natural elements inside and out. Our physical and mental health may depend on it.

 

Attention Amazon Shoppers – Join the MHANJ on AmazonSmile Every Day

amazon mhanj 2015

Attention Amazon Shoppers —

Here’s an Easy Way to Support the MHANJ!
AmazonSmile is a website connected to Amazon.com, offering a simple and automatic way for you to support the MHANJ at no cost to you each time you shop. YOU get the same Amazon selection, while the MHANJ gets a charitable donation of .5% of your purchase of tens of millions of eligible items.
Please Join Us!
Here are a few quick and easy steps that will enable you to join in:
2. Follow directions to set up an account. Please be sure that the Mental Health Association in New Jersey (or the New Jersey Mental Health Association — we may be listed as either)
is selected as your charity.
3. When you want to shop on Amazon, go to smile.amazon.com, and make sure you are logged in before you make your purchases.
Questions? Please contact Merrill Altberg, Director of Communications at maltberg@mhanj.org or 973-571-4100, ext. 118.
Private and Public Sector New Jersey Leaders Meet for Mental Health First Aid Partners Summit
Mental Health Association in New Jersey

Panelists and leadership for the Mental Health First Aid Summit. Back row, left to right: Bob Kley, Vice President and COO, Mental Health Association in New Jersey; Robin E. Mockenhaupt, PhD, MPH, MBA, Chief of Staff, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Lauren Luik, Project Director, Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey. Front Row, left to right: Carolyn Beauchamp, ACSW, MSW, President and CEO, Mental Health Association in New Jersey; Linda Rosenberg, MSW, President and CEO, National Council for Behavioral Health; Bryan V. Gibb, Director of Public Education, National Council for Behavioral Health; Joseph Pyle, MA, President, Thomas Scattergood Behavioral

MARCH 16, 2016, Verona, NJ – Nearly 100 private and public sector leaders from throughout the state met today to address a major, but often overlooked, community health issue — mental health — at the largest gathering of its kind to date, the Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey Partners Summit.  Mental Health First Aid is an innovative, evidence-based 8-hour curriculum that teaches mental health literacy and preparedness skills to help people recognize early signs of a mental health problem and offer support and resources.   More than half a million people in the U.S. have been certified since 2008, with just over 7,000 of them in New Jersey.

“The Partners Summit‘s aim was to convene leading organizations, including businesses, philanthropic foundations, municipalities, non-profits and educational institutions to talk about this issue that affects all of us – mental health – and explore ways to work together to bring Mental Health First Aid to every corner of the state,” said Robert Kley, Vice President and COO of the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, which received funding for  Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

National health experts Linda Rosenberg, MSW, president and CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health in Washington, DC, and Robin E. Mockenhaupt, PhD, MPH, MBA, chief of staff for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, served as keynote speakers.   Rosenberg’s tenure at the National Council, which runs Mental Health First Aid in the U.S., has been characterized by major legislative policy developments that are improving mental health care at all levels.  The grassroots-driven Mental Health First Aid movement has received nearly $50 million in federal funding over the last three years, but according to Rosenberg, more must be done at the state and community levels.

“With one in four Americans experiencing a mental health or addiction disorder each year, the National Council is committed to making this important training as common as CPR,”  she said. “Achieving that, and the goal of our ‘Be One in a Million’  Campaign — which seeks to double the number of people certified in Mental Health First Aid — will only be possible through the state-based momentum and collaborations created by efforts like Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey.”

At today’s gathering at the Robert Wood Foundation in Princeton, attendees learned more about the Mental Health First Aid curriculum and how it is being used across the state to reach a variety of audiences in diverse community settings that include schools, colleges and universities, YMCAs, houses of worship, libraries, businesses, police and fire departments and hospitals.

William J. Lovett, Executive Director of the New Jersey YMCA State Alliance, the organizing body of the state’s 37 Ys, believes that the Partners Summit offers participants a unique opportunity to affect important changes in perceptions about mental illness that can have a lasting and beneficial impact on the entire state.   “By exploring synergies between providers of Mental Health First Aid and organizations that have the infrastructure and resources to disseminate and support it, we can ensure that every community in New Jersey has access to this life-changing – and in some cases, potentially life-saving – training,” Lovett said.

“Mental health is a critical aspect of overall health and wellness, but common misperceptions exist that foster stigma and prevent people from getting the help they need,” said Carolyn Beauchamp, president and CEO of the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, host of today’s gathering.  “We must  give everyone the tools they need to recognize when there is a problem as early as possible — and most important, to know what to do to help themselves or someone else.  Mental Health First Aid does just that.”

Other distinguished speakers at the Summit included James J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County Executive; Joe Pyle, President, Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation; and Bryan V. Gibb, Director of Public Education, National Council for Behavioral Health.

About the Mental Health Association in New Jersey

Since 1948, the Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) has worked to fulfill its mission by responding to issues and concerns raised by consumers of mental health services, and then working for changes and promoting policies that protect their rights and fight the stigma that surrounds mental illness and makes recovery difficult. The MHANJ advocates for systems change with elected and appointed government officials on the state, federal and local levels. Administrative, legal, budgetary and treatment issues that affect people with mental illness are all addressed.

MHANJ’s state headquarters is located in Verona, New Jersey; additional locations include Atlantic, Hudson, Ocean and Union Counties and affiliates in Essex, Monmouth, Morris and Passaic Counties and Southwestern New Jersey. For more information about MHANJ, visit www.mhanj.org, call 973-571-4100 or follow MHANJ on Facebook.

 

 

Tuning In –  MHANJ Educates with Caucus Educational Corporation
Through a special education and awareness building initiative, the MHANJ has been working with Steve Adubato, President and Executive Producer of the Caucus Educational Corporation, and his team, to be included in television shows they produce enabling us to inform the public about our advocacy and programs.
About Mental Health Association in New Jersey’s NJ Connect for Recovery, a Free, Confidential Call Line

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) provides an invaluable service in the war against opiate addition in New Jersey —  NJ Connect for Recovery, the only call line in New Jersey dedicated to providing counseling specifically to individuals and families who are coping with addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers. This service helps to address the severe opiate misuse problem, which has reached epidemic proportions in our state. The toll free phone number for NJ Connect for Recovery is 855-652-3737 (TTY: 877-294-4356) and the website URL is http://www.njconnectforrecovery.org/.

“NJ Connect for Recovery is an example of a private/public partnership. It is the result of collaboration between the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addition Services, the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office and our sponsor, Actavis, plc. Our goal is to address the opiate misuse crisis by enhancing services to those who are addicted and providing guidance and support to their loved ones who have often been at a loss about how to find help,” stated William Waldman, MHANJ’s Board of Trustees Chairperson, faculty member of the Rutgers University School of Social Work and former Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Human Services.

NJ Connect for Recovery Press Release

GCADA 2014 REPORT — A Strategic Actoin Plan to Address a Burgeoning Heroin-Opiate Edpidemic Among Adolescents and Young Adults

NJ Connect for Recovery Promotional Flyer to Post and Share (color)

NJ Connect for Recovery Promotional Flyer to Post and Share (black and white)

Click here for Tell 2 Friends Campaign Registration and help us spread the word.

Click here for the NJ Connect for Recovery website.

 

 

 

Mental Health Association in New Jersey in Hudson County

About the Mental Health Association in New Jersey

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) in Hudson County provides direct services to support and educate individuals with mental health challenges.

The MHANJ is a statewide non-profit organization that strives for mental health for children and adults through advocacy, education, training and services. Since 1948, the MHANJ has fulfilled its mission by responding to issues raised by consumers of mental health services, working for changes and promoting policies that protect their rights and fighting the stigma that makes mental health recovery difficult. The MHANJ also provides program that directly assist consumers in need, reducing the strain on  limited government resources.

We continue to be a driving force through our advocacy efforts, working to ensure that mental health consumers have a voice.

About Peer Outreach Support Team (POST) Services in Hudson County
The Mental Health Association in New Jersey’s Peer Outreach Support Team (MHANJ’s POST) program consists of peers, people in recovery from mental health problems, who can shared lived experience and serve as role models. POST staff members provide emotional support, information and assistance with referrals and links to community resources, such as mental health, medical, housing, employment and self-help programs. They also provide in-home peer counseling to consumers in crisis and assist them on the road to recovery.

The POST program is truly peers helping peers. The MHANJ has a long history of creating job opportunities for
consumers of mental health services, starting the POST program in the Atlantic County office in 1986. Through the years, peers who work on the POST teams have demonstrated that they are sometimes better able to engage consumers in services due to their first-hand knowledge of the mental health system from a consumer perspective. Working with peer staff members can be especially inspirational and empowering for consumers who have not worked or are not in the workforce.

Eligibility
The Mental Health Association in New Jersey offers POST programs in Atlantic, Hudson, Ocean and Union Counties. Most POST clients live in the community and need treatment and support to help avoid relapse
and/or re-hospitalization. We often work closely with people who have recently been discharged from the hospital, or have been screened in an emergency room or screening center, but were not hospitalized. We help people avoid crisis and stay healthy in the community.

How POST Works
POST encourages people to take responsibility for their own recovery. We usually work closely with a client for three-to-six months developing a partnership to create and support the client’s own recovery goals. In addition to the important one-to-one support. POST workers run a variety of groups such as twelve step recovery meetings and
sessions that focus on wellness, employment, communication skills and social activities. These are held in various places including churches, self-help centers, boarding homes and other community settings.

How to Get POST Services
Ideally, individuals refer themselves for POST services but referrals can also come from family members, mental health or human services providers if the individual agrees to the referral. For more information please call 201-653-4700.

Additional Services Available in Hudson County and Statewide

Advocacy
The MHANJ’s Government Affairs department is the leader in advocacy for New Jersey mental health system initiatives. We work at the state and federal levels to improve policies and government responsiveness to consumer needs.

Community Education
The MHANJ’s Community Education Department uses an engaging approach to educate the public about mental health issues, fight stigma and promote mental wellness. A variety of topics and customized programs are available to meet the specific needs of an organization. (Statewide)

Educational presentations are available on-site at schools, health fairs, businesses and community organizations. Topics include: Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), a personal roadmap for recovery; and Hearing Distressing Voices, a simulated experience that incites an understanding of challenges faced by those with psychiatric problems; and many others.

• Mental Health First Aid is a public education program that introduces participants to risk factors and warning signs of mental illnesses, builds understanding of their impact, and provides information about common
supports. This eight-hour course uses role-playing and simulations to demonstrate how to offer initial help in a mental health crisis and connect persons to the appropriate professional, peer, social and self-help care. The
program covers specific types of illness including anxiety, depression, substance use, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and schizophrenia. Mental Health First Aid is included on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP). The MHANJ has certified staff available to provide trainings.

The MHANJ’s Mental Health Players program uses trained volunteers to present interactive role plays simulating mental health issues and facilitate guided discussion on the topics.

The MHANJ’s Promoting Emotional Wellness and Spirituality Program (PEWS) educates faith-based communities to better recognize mental illness and to increase awareness of resources.

Employment and Workforce Development
The MHANJ is the leading trainer of providers and peers working in New Jersey’s mental health system. We offer a comprehensive continuum of job readiness, job placement and post-employment support as well as professional development opportunities for providers.

The MHANJ’s Career Connection Employment Resource Institute (CCERI) assists the mental health community in creating positive career paths for mental health consumers. Vocational preparation for mental health consumers includes a comprehensive Tools for Success program that covers job readiness and employment skills. We also provide partial care prevocational and specialized employment professional development for providers. (Statewide)

The MHANJ’s Consumer Connections is a nationally recognized program which recruits, trains and supports individuals in mental health recovery striving to become providers of mental health services. The program operates a job bank and meets the educational requirements that lead to Certification as a Recovery Support Practitioner (CRSP) and Certification as a Co-occurring Disorders Professional (CCDP). (Statewide)

The MHANJ’s services are funded through the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

MHANJ’s Call Center
The Mental Health Association in New Jersey’s (MHANJ’s) Call Center recently achieved a mark of distinction by attaining national accreditation from Contact USA, one of the only programs in the country devoted to maintaining standards of service at calling programs.

NJ Connect for Recovery is the only call line dedicated to providing counseling specifically to individuals and families coping with addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers. (855-652-3737)

New Jersey MentalHealthCares is our mental health information and referral service which provides ongoing
emotional support, case management and intervention as well as mental health screenings. (866-202-HELP) (4357)

Peer Recovery WarmLine (PRW) is a peer-run service providing ongoing telephone support to mental health consumers as they work on their recovery. (877-292-5588)

For more information about the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, visit mhanj.org, email info@mhanj.org or call 800-367-8850.

 

The MHANJ’s services are funded, in part, through the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

 

Mental Health Association in New Jersey in Union County

About the Mental Health Association in New Jersey in Union County

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) in Union County provides direct services to support and educate individuals with mental health challenges and their family members.

The MHANJ is a statewide non-profit organization that strives for mental health for children and adults through advocacy, education, training and services. Since 1948, the MHANJ has fulfilled its mission by responding to issues raised by consumers of mental health services, working for changes and promoting policies that protect their rights and fighting the stigma that makes mental health recovery difficult. The MHANJ also provides program that directly assist consumers in need, reducing the strain on  limited government resrouces.

We continue to be a driving force through our advocacy efforts, working to ensure that mental health consumers have a voice.

Services Available in Union County and Statewide

Advocacy
The MHANJ’s Government Affairs department is the leader in advocacy for New Jersey mental health system initiatives. We work at the state and federal levels to improve policies and government responsiveness to consumer needs.

Individual and Family Support
The MHANJ’s services for individuals and families provide emotional support and advice, helping those touched by mental health challenges learn how to cope and advocate for themselves.

These services are available statewide or in specified regions.

• The MHANJ’s Peer Recovery WarmLine is a toll-free peer-run service providing ongoing telephone support to mental health consumers working toward recovery. (Statewide)

• The MHANJ’s Intensive Family Support Services (IFFS) provides support, education, respite care and advocacy for families of people with mental health problems. (Atlantic and Union Counties)

• The MHANJ’s Acute Family Care program provides mentoring for family members of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. (Atlantic and Union Counties)

• The MHANJ’s Self Help-Centers provide an environment of mutual support and empowerment that promotes wellness. (Atlantic, and Ocean Counties) Esperanza is the only Self-Help Center in New Jersey that specializes in serving Spanish-speaking consumers. (Union County)

• MHANJ’s Peer Outreach Support Teams (POST) provide individual, direct advocacy and peer counseling to adult
mental health consumers move toward wellness and integration back into their communities. (Atlantic, Hudson,
Ocean and Union County)

Community Education
The MHANJ’s Community Education Department uses an engaging approach to educate the public about mental health issues, fight stigma and promote mental wellness. A variety of topics and customized programs are available to meet the specific needs of an organization. (Statewide)

Educational presentations are available on-site at schools, health fairs, businesses and community organizations. Topics include: Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), a personal roadmap for recovery; and Hearing Distressing Voices, a simulated experience that incites an understanding of challenges faced by those with psychiatric problems; and many others.

The MHANJ’s Mental Health Players program uses trained volunteers to present interactive role plays simulating mental health issues and facilitate guided discussion on the topics.

The MHANJ’s Promoting Emotional Wellness and Spirituality Program (PEWS) educates faith-based communities to better recognize mental illness and to increase awareness of resources.

Employment and Workforce Development
The MHANJ is the leading trainer of providers and peers working in New Jersey’s mental health system. We offer a comprehensive continuum of job readiness, job placement and post-employment support as well as professional development opportunities for providers.

The MHANJ’s Career Connection Employment Resource Institute (CCERI) assists the mental health community in creating positive career paths for mental health consumers. Vocational preparation for mental health consumers includes a comprehensive Tools for Success program that covers job readiness and employment skills. We also provide partial care prevocational and specialized employment professional development for providers. (Statewide)

The MHANJ’s Consumer Connections is a nationally recognized program which recruits, trains and supports individuals in mental health recovery striving to become providers of mental health services. The program operates a job bank and meets the educational requirements that lead to Certification as a Recovery Support Practitioner (CRSP) and Certification as a Co-occurring Disorders Professional (CCDP). (Statewide)

The MHANJ’s services are funded through the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services.
MHANJ’s Call Center
The Mental Health Association in New Jersey’s (MHANJ’s) Call Center recently achieved a mark of distinction by attaining national accreditation from Contact USA, one of the only programs in the country devoted to maintaining standards of service at calling programs.

NJ Connect for Recovery is the only call line dedicated to providing counseling specifically to individuals and families coping with addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers. (855-652-3737)

New Jersey MentalHealthCares is our mental health information and referral service which provides ongoing
emotional support, case management and intervention as well as mental health screenings. (866-202-HELP) (4357)

Peer Recovery WarmLine (PRW) is a peer-run service providing ongoing telephone support to mental health consumers as they work on their recovery. (877-292-5588)

We also operate the NJ Disaster Mental Health Helpline and are a National Suicide Prevention LifeLine participating
center.

Mental wellness plays an invaluable role in our overall health by instilling a feeling of well-being and satisfaction. At certain times in our lives we may need help to regain our sense of emotional balance.
About one out of five American adults suffers from a mental illness. Rich or poor, young or old and any race or ethnicity – all of us may be vulnerable to problems ranging from short term emotional difficulties to chronic mental health problems.

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) is dedicated to striving for mental health for children and adults and helping those who are coping with opiate addiction and their family members through advocacy, education, training and services.

Experiential Therapies

Developed in the 1970s, experiential therapy is a category of therapy focused on an approach that encourages clients to identify and address issues through activities such as role playing, guided imagery, the use of props, and a range of other active experiences. Some examples of experiential therapy include recreation therapy, equine assisted therapy, expressive arts therapy, music therapy, wilderness therapy, adventure therapy, psychodrama and more recently, surf therapy.

One of the many advantages of experiential therapy is that the experiences and activities that form the core of the process provide opportunities for the therapist to observe their clients in a situation where the client is not focused on the therapy itself. For example, during an equine assisted therapy session, clients will likely be focused on completing an assigned task with a horse, and will be more likely to let his/her guard down than he or she would during a traditional individual or group talk therapy session.

Experiential therapy has been an effective component of comprehensive treatment programs for individuals who are struggling with a range of issues and disorders. It has been successfully integrated into treatment programs for adults and teens that are being treated for substance use disorders, behavioral disorders, mood disorders, eating disorders, grief/loss, trauma, sex addiction and compulsive gambling.

Funding for Superstorm Sandy Recovery
Efforts through Generous Grants from:
American Red Cross Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Mental Health Association in New Jersey, Inc.

Address: 673 Morris Ave., Suite 100
                        Springfield, NJ 07081

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