Over 450 New Jersey Advocates Tell Congress No Housing Cuts

PRESS RELEASE
Press Contacts at Monarch Housing Associates:
• Kate Kelly, (908) 272-5363 x224 (o), (908) 347-1064 (c), kkelly@monarchhousing.org
• Richard Brown, (908) 272-5363 x 225 (o) , (908) 370-5249 (c), rbrown@monarchhousing.org

For Immediate Release

Housing and homelessness advocates share their stories with NJ Congressional delegation in DC
July 26, 2017 —  Over 450 advocates have travel to Washington, DC with the message “No
Cuts to Housing.” Constituents will meet with New Jersey’s congressional delegation regarding investments in affordable homes to prevent and end homelessness. Advocates will urge legislators to oppose proposed devastating spending cuts to programs that give New Jersey residents access to affordable homes.
Due to low spending limits, the draft U.S. House of Representatives Transportation Housing and Urban
Development (T-HUD) Appropriations Committee bill, released earlier this month, provides at least $1.5
billion less than what is needed. This proposed funding level will not ensure that every household in New
Jersey currently receiving housing assistance remain in their homes.
The funding cuts in the House Bill are not as deep as President Trump’s proposed budget released in May.

However, the bill significantly cuts funding that New Jersey relies on for critical affordable housing
resources that rebuild the lives of extremely low income seniors, people with disabilities, families with
children, veterans, and other vulnerable population.

“The impact of sequestration and proposed further budget cuts reduces the budget of the Housing and
Urban Development (HUD) as well as other domestic programs. The lack of affordable homes and the
resources needed to maintain existing public housing creates an affordable housing state of emergency in
New Jersey,” says Richard Brown, CEO of Monarch Housing Associates. “The state’s housing affordability crisis is exacerbated by the increasing lack of affordable homes and threats to Medicaid funding. Our elected officials in Washington should continue to fight cuts to housing funding”
On July 26, advocates will convene in the Dirksen Senate Office Building. Individuals impacted by
homelessness and living in each New Jersey’s twelve congressional districts will directly address New
Jeresey’s Congressional delegation. The speakers will share their stories and explain how further cuts to
housing funding would hurt low-income New Jereyans

“The Trump Administration’s proposed housing cuts are unfathomable and cruel,” said Staci Berger,
president and chief executive officer of the Housing and Community Development Network of New Jersey (the Network). “New Jersey’s economy has failed to keep pace with the rest of the nation; our residents and neighborhoods need investment and support so that we can get back on track. We urge our
Congressional delegation to oppose these cuts, as many of them have, and to help build a thriving NJ by
standing up for policies and programs that make sure we can all afford to call NJ home.”
Nohemy Zabala lives in Morristown and will be at the Congressional Reception in Washington, DC. She is sharing her story on July 26 because she says, “Housing waiting lists can go on for years. If a family does not have a place to go, they end up living in a shelter or on the street.” Recently homeless, Nohemy and her mother now live in their own home and this fall, she will attend Drew University. She worries that further cuts to federal housing funding will result in fewer families offered housing opportunities.

PRESS RELEASE
Press Contacts at Monarch Housing Associates:
• Kate Kelly, (908) 272-5363 x224 (o), (908) 347-1064 (c), kkelly@monarchhousing.org
• Richard Brown, (908) 272-5363 x 225 (o) , (908) 370-5249 (c), rbrown@monarchhousing.org
2
“We elect our Congress to be the voice of everyone –the rich and the poor,” says Nohemy Zabala. “Many
organizations want to help the many people experiencing homelessness that need help – the lack of
willingness to help end homelessness is not the issue. The lack of funding is issue.”
Brian Kulas of East Brunswick will join Nohemy and other advocates traveling to Washington, DC and tell his story. “I am very fortunate to have affordable housing. I believe that many like me share the same
potential to be an advocate,” says Brian who was once homeless but now lives in his own home. He has
attended college and become an advocate for affordable homes. “Stable affordable housing is not only a
basic need but can be a cornerstone to recovery generating self-improvement. Funding for affordable
housing builds stronger communities, fosters inclusion that builds unity, and breaks down social barriers
between neighbors.”

“All of the improvements that I made in my life, began with my rental subsidy and having my own home – being given Housing First. A rental voucher gave me the opportunity to choose a new direction for my
future and discover a healthier way to live.” says Brian.

Policy experts from across New Jersey will also share their perspective on the impact in New Jersey from
proposed funding cuts from Washington.

“With a shortage of over 212,000 affordable homes in New Jersey and more people moving into the ranks of the working poor in recent years, housing cuts at the federal level would further devastate the 37% of residents of our state who struggle to meet all of their basic necessities with the high cost of housing,”says Renee Koubiadis, Executive Director Anti-Poverty Network (APN) of New Jersey, a partner organization in planning the Congressional Reception. “APN is proud to support the Congressional Reception as part of our statewide mission to prevent, reduce, and end poverty in New Jersey. The 450 people attending this year’s Congressional Reception include constituents from each congressional district who have lived experience of poverty and/or homelessness. These voices critical part to the dialogue for housing funding and solutions.”

Monarch Housing Associates has taken the lead in planning the Congressional Reception with 38 partner organizations from across New Jersey. All of partners, donors, and bus sponsors contribute to the success o f the Congressional Reception.

“Catholic Charities works to serve those in need and to empower them to build lives of dignity and
economic security. We know how critical safe, affordable housing is to the well-being of families, and so we are distressed as we contemplate cuts in housing assistance,” says Kevin Hickey, Executive Director,
Catholic Charities Diocese of Camden, a partner organization in planning the Congresional Reception “Faithbased groups and the non-profit sector do not have the resources to replace those functions which are the legitimate responsibility of government and the private sector. We believe in the common good, and governmental housing programs for the disabled, working people, and the poor are vital for the promotion of the common good.”

You can follow the Congressional Reception on twitter and facebook at #NJHillDay and #NoHousingCuts. The Congressional Reception takes place in conjunction with “Our Homes, Our Voices,” the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC)’s National Housing Week of Action. You can follow “Our Homes, Our Voices” at #OurHomesOurVoices.

Grief Recovery Support Group: The Action Program for  Moving Beyond Death, Divorce and Other Losses
 People may say you have to let go and move on in your life,
but they don’t tell you what you need to do to accomplish that.
The Mental Health Association in New Jersey will be offering a new series entitled, The Grief Recovery Method®, which can make coping with grief possible as and provide partnerships and guidance to help ensure that it happens.
Whether your loss is due to:
The death of a loved one
Divorce or end of a relationship
Career changes
Lack of trust
Questioning faith
Safety concerns
Health issues
 Your feelings are normal and natural.
The problem is that we have been socialized to believe that these
feelings are abnormal and inappropriate.
Myths about grief:
Time heals all wounds
Replace the loss
Grieve alone
Be strong for others
Bury your feelings
The Grief Recovery Method® Outreach Program group will be scheduled periodically throughout the year.
Cost for this session only $50 for the eight weeks.
(Regular price is $250 for eight weeks.)
To register or if you have any questions please contact Laverne Williams, Certified Grief Recovery Specialists® at 973-571-4100, ext. 130, or lwilliams@mhanj.org.
MHANJ’s Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey Initiative Wins National Award for Excellence in Mental Health First Aid Community Impact 

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey’s Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey leadership team members accepted the Excellence in Mental Health First Aid Community Impact Award from the National Council for Behavioral Health. Left to right: Jaime Angelini, Ruth Kaluski, Robert Kley, Lauren Luik, Laverne Williams.

Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey, an initiative led by the Mental Health Association in New Jersey and a coalition of 16 stakeholder organizations, has earned the Excellence in Mental Health First Aid Community Impact Award from the National Council for Behavioral Health, based in Washington, DC.  Presented at the National Council’s recent annual NATCON conference in Seattle, this prestigious award recognizes Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey’s commitment to the international Mental Health First Aid movement and the significant impact it has had on communities throughout the state in expanding the use of the evidence-based mental health literacy and skills-training curriculum.

“Mental Health First Aid is a key catalyst for stigma-reduction efforts, and over time, will help us move toward deeper integration of physical and mental health care. It is our hope that the Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey model we’ve pioneered will be adopted by other states around the country, further extending its impact,” stated Carolyn Beauchamp, President and CEO of the Mental Health Association in New Jersey.

“This award is the culmination of the great work of a broad coalition that has extended the reach of Mental Health First Aid in our state,” said Robert Kley, Vice President and COO of the Mental Health Association in New Jersey.  “We thank all of our stakeholders, especially the Mental Health Association’s affiliates and chapters covering 11 New Jersey counties, our behavioral health provider partners, and statewide community health and prevention organizations including the New Jersey Alliance of YMCAs and the Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse.   We also acknowledge the National Council’s mentorship and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for its generosity.  And, we express our appreciation to all Mental Health First Aid instructors in the state, who are the true backbone of this effort.”

About Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey

By organizing previously disparate training efforts, the Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey collaboration has contributed to an increase in the number of people in New Jersey certified in Mental Health First Aid, from an estimated 4,500 in September 2015 when the initiative began, to nearly 13,000 at present, according to the National Council.  Among those trained have been educators and guidance counselors, first responders including firefighters and police officers, YMCA staff members, college students, librarians, Girl Scout troop leaders, nurses, veteran peer navigators, and people working in homeless and other social services, to name a few.

Mental Health First Aid is an innovative, 8-hour course that teaches people the skills to help someone who is developing a mental health or substance abuse problem or experiencing a crisis. The program has been shown in numerous studies to reduce stigma and negative attitudes, improve understanding and increase the likelihood that help will be offered.   Of critical importance, the course builds mental health literacy, helping the public identify, understand, and respond to signs of common mental health and substance abuse problems.

Support for Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Foundation.

About the National Council for Behavioral Health’s Awards of Excellence

The twenty-two awards handed out during the 2017 NATCON conference are fondly dubbed, “The Oscars of Behavioral Health.”

“These honorees show us what excellence in behavioral health looks like,” said Linda Rosenberg, President and CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health. “They are finding ways to make a real difference in their communities.”

About the Mental Health Association in New Jersey

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey is a statewide non-profit organization that strives for children and adults to achieve victory over mental illness and substance use disorders through advocacy, education, training, and services. The Mental Health Association in New Jersey’s state headquarters is located in Springfield, New Jersey; additional locations include Atlantic, Hudson, Ocean and Union Counties with affiliates in Essex, Monmouth, Morris and Passaic Counties and Southwestern New Jersey. For more information about MHANJ, visit www.mhanj.org.

 

 

 

 

MHANJ and New Jersey Alliance of YMCAs Partner to Make a Difference in Behavioral Health

 

Who would have thought that the YMCA and the Mental Health Association in New Jersey could find such synergy in grass roots efforts to improve behavioral health in our state? Here’s what happened when they put their heads and hearts together to address a critical need — helping New Jerseyans who are coping with mental illness and substance use issues.

First, a look at the problem…Mental health and substance use problems affect more than 60 million people in the U.S., yet the vast majority do not seek or get needed care. New Jersey statistics mirror the national norm, with only an estimated 39% of the people who experience these problems receiving treatment and/or counseling. Fears of being subjected to bias or stigma, the public’s lack of understanding and acceptance of these disorders, and the challenge of navigating the behavioral health system are often insurmountable barriers that stand in the way of treatment.

This is where the YMCAs come in…YMCAs have unique roles in their individual communities that enable them to interact with thousands of people of all ages every day, helping them to grow in spirit, mind and body. The opportunity to normalize conversations about mental health and substance use disorders and create positive social change through YMCAs is significant, as they are seen as trusted, welcoming institutions.

The New Jersey Alliance of YMCAs, representing the 35 YMCAs in the state, was one of the first key stakeholders to sign on to the Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey Project, which is run by the Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) and funded by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Mental Health First Aid is a public education program that teaches the risk factors and warning signs of mental illnesses, builds understanding of their impact, and gives participants skills that enable them to offer support and connect people with the resources and help they need. The Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey Project’s mission is to increase access to this important training across the state. In its first year and a half of existence, it has made significant strides by developing partnerships with major organizations like the YMCA.

“The YMCAs historic role in helping members improve their physical health is well known, but we are also aligned with the Mental Health Association in New Jersey in our shared belief that there really is no such thing as health and well-being without good mental health,” said Bill Lovett, Executive Director of the New Jersey Alliance of YMCAs.  “We have a tremendous opportunity to change perspectives about mental illness and reduce stigma through the use of Mental Health First Aid in our YMCAs and the communities they serve. We are proud to work as a strategic partner with the Mental Health Association in New Jersey to accomplish this.”

Here’s a real example of how it works… Darcy Dobens, LSW, is Director of the Bayshore Family Success Center, a program of the Community YMCA funded by the Department of Children and Families, Division of Families and Community Partnerships.  She is also a Mental Health First Aid instructor, and knows firsthand how important it is for staff members to be trained in the curriculum.  “Recently, a woman came in with her  two children and was obviously distraught about her ability to pay her rent, and fearful that she would be evicted.  By using the techniques taught in MHFA, our staff was able to recognize that she was experiencing an emotional crisis that was contributing to her inability to maintain employment and function well in her other day-to-day activities.   As a Family Success Center, we are often the first place people go for help.  We can make a big difference by identifying  a core problem, like depression or addiction, and then connecting people to the behavioral health services that they need.”

An exponential win/win…The YMCAs continued involvement in the Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey Project ensures that more and more YMCA staff members are trained in Mental Health First Aid and certified as instructors of the curriculum. This provides access to an increasing number of trained behavioral health advocates for the thousands of adults and children who use YMCA facilities every day. Here are just a few details about the partnership:

— The New Jersey Alliance of YMCAs and other YMCAs have participated as committed stakeholders to help shape the Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey Project and the entire training landscape in the state.

— Regional YMCA Mental Health First Aid Trainings during the summer of 2016 resulted in the certification of nearly 70 YMCA staff members from throughout the state.

— YMCAs in Madison, Basking Ridge, Montclair, Madison, Summit, Red Bank, Elizabeth, Fanwood-Scotch Plains, Westfield and Hopewell Valley have trained hundreds of people in Mental Health First Aid in the last two years.  There are many stories from these YMCAs about the impact that Mental Health First Aid has had in the lives of instructors, First Aiders, YMCA members and communities.

“Our partnership with the YMCA helps us dramatically expand the reach of Mental Health First Aid throughout New Jersey.  We tremendously value the Y’s commitment  to this initiative and look forward to building on this important collaboration in the future,” said Robert Kley, Vice President and COO of the Mental Health Association in New Jersey.

For more information about Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey (MHFA4NJ) contact Ruth Kaluski at 973-571-4100, ext. 136, or rkaluski@mhanj.org or click here to visit the MHFA4NJ Facebook page.

MHANJ’s MHFA4NJ Project Receives National Excellence Award

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey is honored to receive the Excellence in Mental Health First Aid Community Impact Award from the National Council for Behavioral Health. This award is for achievement in serving as a leader in coordinating Mental Health First Aid Training across New Jersey through our Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey (MHFA4NJ) Project, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Our shared recognition is extended to our core stakeholders who collaborate with us in providing training and shaping the project.

The Healing Power of Nature

Healthcare practitioners employ an array of modalities in the treatment of physical and mental health disorders. Medication management, therapy, exercise and other lifestyle changes are regularly recommended.  Often overlooked is an inexpensive option for the maintenance of good physical and mental health: nature. There is now a significant body of evidence supporting the mental health benefits of outdoor immersion.

“Green therapy” known as ecotherapy, has been shown to alleviate symptoms of depression.  In the early 1980’s, the forest agency of Japan encouraged people to walk in the woods for better health. Known as “forest bathing” or shinrin-yoku, the practice was believed to lower stress.  Yoshifumi Miyazaki, researcher at Chiba University in Japan, found significantly lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol in people who spent 40 minutes daily walking in the woods compared to those spending 40 minutes walking in a lab.

Similarly, in a 2010 multi-study analysis, conducted by researchers from the University of Essex in the United Kingdom revealed a 71% reduction in depressive symptoms for those who simply took a walk outside compared to a control group who took a walk at a shopping center. Of the shopping center walkers, only 45% reported reduced depression while 22% felt more depressed. Nature exposure produced both short-term and long-term positive health outcomes in self-esteem and mood. The greatest improvements in self-esteem were found in people with mental health disorders.

In 2015, Stanford researchers compared psychological effects of two groups of participants; one which walked for 90 minutes in a high traffic urban setting while the second walked in a grassland setting with trees and shrubs. Although little difference was found in physiological conditions, interestingly, decreased neural activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex was found in those walking in urban areas. This brain region is involved in rumination during which individuals may focus on negative emotions and is implicated in the development of depressive symptoms. (http://www.pnsa.org/content/early/2015/06/23/1510459112)

In an increasingly urbanized world, these findings suggest access to a natural environment and the preservation of parks, trees and open spaces may be vital to mental health. Currently more than half of the world’s population resides in an urban area. Notably, city dwellers experience a 40% higher risk of mood disorders compared to rural dwellers. They also experience a 20% higher risk of anxiety disorders and twice the rates of schizophrenia. (https://depts.washington-edu/hhwb/Thm_Mental.html)

At the forefront of studying the connection between people and environment is The Natural Capital Project (http://www.naturalcapitalproject.org/) a joint partnership between Stanford University, The University of Minnesota, the Nature Conservancy and the World Wildlife Fund. Using an interdisciplinary team, the project develops quantifiable methods to understand the nexus between environment and health. Using science-informed decisions, targeted capital investments are then made to maintain the wellbeing of both.

Exactly how nature works to improve a sense of wellbeing is unclear, however the foregoing studies and projects strongly suggest at the very least, time spent in a natural environment improves people’s moods.  Danielle Shanahan Phd, researcher at the University of Queensland, reports simply putting a plant in your window elicits a range of benefits. While some may be able to take a daily walk in a natural setting, we can also strive to make our schools, offices, and living spaces healthier by the addition of natural elements inside and out. Our physical and mental health may depend on it.

 

Attention Amazon Shoppers – Join the MHANJ on AmazonSmile Every Day

amazon mhanj 2015

Attention Amazon Shoppers —

Here’s an Easy Way to Support the MHANJ!
AmazonSmile is a website connected to Amazon.com, offering a simple and automatic way for you to support the MHANJ at no cost to you each time you shop. YOU get the same Amazon selection, while the MHANJ gets a charitable donation of .5% of your purchase of tens of millions of eligible items.
Please Join Us!
Here are a few quick and easy steps that will enable you to join in:
2. Follow directions to set up an account. Please be sure that the Mental Health Association in New Jersey (or the New Jersey Mental Health Association — we may be listed as either)
is selected as your charity.
3. When you want to shop on Amazon, go to smile.amazon.com, and make sure you are logged in before you make your purchases.
Questions? Please contact Merrill Altberg, Director of Communications at maltberg@mhanj.org or 973-571-4100, ext. 118.
Private and Public Sector New Jersey Leaders Meet for Mental Health First Aid Partners Summit
Mental Health Association in New Jersey

Panelists and leadership for the Mental Health First Aid Summit. Back row, left to right: Bob Kley, Vice President and COO, Mental Health Association in New Jersey; Robin E. Mockenhaupt, PhD, MPH, MBA, Chief of Staff, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Lauren Luik, Project Director, Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey. Front Row, left to right: Carolyn Beauchamp, ACSW, MSW, President and CEO, Mental Health Association in New Jersey; Linda Rosenberg, MSW, President and CEO, National Council for Behavioral Health; Bryan V. Gibb, Director of Public Education, National Council for Behavioral Health; Joseph Pyle, MA, President, Thomas Scattergood Behavioral

MARCH 16, 2016 — Verona, NJ – Nearly 100 private and public sector leaders from throughout the state met today to address a major, but often overlooked, community health issue — mental health — at the largest gathering of its kind to date, the Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey Partners Summit.  Mental Health First Aid is an innovative, evidence-based 8-hour curriculum that teaches mental health literacy and preparedness skills to help people recognize early signs of a mental health problem and offer support and resources.   More than half a million people in the U.S. have been certified since 2008, with just over 7,000 of them in New Jersey.

“The Partners Summit‘s aim was to convene leading organizations, including businesses, philanthropic foundations, municipalities, non-profits and educational institutions to talk about this issue that affects all of us – mental health – and explore ways to work together to bring Mental Health First Aid to every corner of the state,” said Robert Kley, Vice President and COO of the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, which received funding for  Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

National health experts Linda Rosenberg, MSW, president and CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health in Washington, DC, and Robin E. Mockenhaupt, PhD, MPH, MBA, chief of staff for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, served as keynote speakers.   Rosenberg’s tenure at the National Council, which runs Mental Health First Aid in the U.S., has been characterized by major legislative policy developments that are improving mental health care at all levels.  The grassroots-driven Mental Health First Aid movement has received nearly $50 million in federal funding over the last three years, but according to Rosenberg, more must be done at the state and community levels.

“With one in four Americans experiencing a mental health or addiction disorder each year, the National Council is committed to making this important training as common as CPR,”  she said. “Achieving that, and the goal of our ‘Be One in a Million’  Campaign — which seeks to double the number of people certified in Mental Health First Aid — will only be possible through the state-based momentum and collaborations created by efforts like Mental Health First Aid for New Jersey.”

At today’s gathering at the Robert Wood Foundation in Princeton, attendees learned more about the Mental Health First Aid curriculum and how it is being used across the state to reach a variety of audiences in diverse community settings that include schools, colleges and universities, YMCAs, houses of worship, libraries, businesses, police and fire departments and hospitals.

William J. Lovett, Executive Director of the New Jersey YMCA State Alliance, the organizing body of the state’s 37 Ys, believes that the Partners Summit offers participants a unique opportunity to affect important changes in perceptions about mental illness that can have a lasting and beneficial impact on the entire state.   “By exploring synergies between providers of Mental Health First Aid and organizations that have the infrastructure and resources to disseminate and support it, we can ensure that every community in New Jersey has access to this life-changing – and in some cases, potentially life-saving – training,” Lovett said.

“Mental health is a critical aspect of overall health and wellness, but common misperceptions exist that foster stigma and prevent people from getting the help they need,” said Carolyn Beauchamp, president and CEO of the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, host of today’s gathering.  “We must  give everyone the tools they need to recognize when there is a problem as early as possible — and most important, to know what to do to help themselves or someone else.  Mental Health First Aid does just that.”

Other distinguished speakers at the Summit included James J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County Executive; Joe Pyle, President, Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation; and Bryan V. Gibb, Director of Public Education, National Council for Behavioral Health.

About the Mental Health Association in New Jersey

Since 1948, the Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) has worked to fulfill its mission by responding to issues and concerns raised by consumers of mental health services, and then working for changes and promoting policies that protect their rights and fight the stigma that surrounds mental illness and makes recovery difficult. The MHANJ advocates for systems change with elected and appointed government officials on the state, federal and local levels. Administrative, legal, budgetary and treatment issues that affect people with mental illness are all addressed.

MHANJ’s state headquarters is located in Verona, New Jersey; additional locations include Atlantic, Hudson, Ocean and Union Counties and affiliates in Essex, Monmouth, Morris and Passaic Counties and Southwestern New Jersey. For more information about MHANJ, visit www.mhanj.org, call 973-571-4100 or follow MHANJ on Facebook.

 

 

Tuning In –  MHANJ Educates with Caucus Educational Corporation
Through a special education and awareness building initiative, the MHANJ has been working with Steve Adubato, President and Executive Producer of the Caucus Educational Corporation, and his team, to be included in television shows they produce enabling us to inform the public about our advocacy and programs.
About Mental Health Association in New Jersey’s NJ Connect for Recovery, a Free, Confidential Call Line

The Mental Health Association in New Jersey (MHANJ) provides an invaluable service in the war against opiate addition in New Jersey —  NJ Connect for Recovery, the only call line in New Jersey dedicated to providing counseling specifically to individuals and families who are coping with addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers. This service helps to address the severe opiate misuse problem, which has reached epidemic proportions in our state. The toll free phone number for NJ Connect for Recovery is 855-652-3737 (TTY: 877-294-4356) and the website URL is http://www.njconnectforrecovery.org/.

“NJ Connect for Recovery is an example of a private/public partnership. It is the result of collaboration between the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addition Services, the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office and our sponsor, Actavis, plc. Our goal is to address the opiate misuse crisis by enhancing services to those who are addicted and providing guidance and support to their loved ones who have often been at a loss about how to find help,” stated William Waldman, MHANJ’s Board of Trustees Chairperson, faculty member of the Rutgers University School of Social Work and former Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Human Services.

NJ Connect for Recovery Press Release

GCADA 2014 REPORT — A Strategic Actoin Plan to Address a Burgeoning Heroin-Opiate Edpidemic Among Adolescents and Young Adults

NJ Connect for Recovery Promotional Flyer to Post and Share (color)

NJ Connect for Recovery Promotional Flyer to Post and Share (black and white)

Click here for Tell 2 Friends Campaign Registration and help us spread the word.

Click here for the NJ Connect for Recovery website.

 

 

 

Funding for Superstorm Sandy Recovery
Efforts through Generous Grants from:
American Red Cross Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Mental Health Association in New Jersey, Inc.

Address: 673 Morris Ave., Suite 100
                        Springfield, NJ 07081

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